Léon Morin, Priest (5/19/12)

Leon Morin, PriestMovie One Hundred Twenty Four

Léon Morin, Priest is the tale of a handsome, young priest living in Nazi-occupied France and his interactions with a non-practicing widow.

A young widow named Barny (Emmanuelle Riva) who lives with her half-Jewish daughter during Nazi occupation in France one day finds herself in a church. She convinces herself she is there to mock the Christian faith during confession and randomly chooses Léon Morin (Jean-Paul Belmondo) as the priest. After seeing that Morin is not shaken by her confrontation and is, in fact, replying as if in an intelligent discussion, she slowly becomes taken with religion as the priest tries to mold her.

Through Léon Morin, Priest there is the constant question of whether Barny is truly practicing religion or if she is merely interested in Morin. At times, both seem plausible. Morin’s own intentions are not always entirely clear, despite remaining devout. The interactions between the characters are shown usually in brief scenes that build upon the story. While I found the characters in Léon Morin, Priest interesting, I was struggling to really care about them. Or perhaps I was having difficulty really understanding the conflict at hand. I never related to Barny or Morin on a personal level and since I’m not religious perhaps that caused the disconnect.

The writer/director, Jean-Pierre Melville, was quickly becoming one of my all-time favorites and this was the first time I’ve seen a film of his that was less than amazing. I enjoyed my time with Léon Morin, Priest, but was ultimately disappointed. While there was nothing technically wrong or missing from the film, ultimately I found myself not really caring about what happened to the characters. Perhaps that is no fault of the film’s but only the fault of the viewer.

I give it 3 confessions out of 5.

Links:

Rotten Tomatoes

IMDB

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One response to “Léon Morin, Priest (5/19/12)

  1. Pingback: May Movies Round-Up | Andy Watches Movies

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