Movie Universe To Live In (Friday Question Fun)

It’s Friday and you know that means its time for some more Friday Question Fun!

If you could live in any movie / TV universe (fictional or non) what would it be?

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The Great Outdoors (8/17/12)

The Great Outdoors

Movie One Hundred Ninety Two

In The Great Outdoors, a man’s perfect family vacation is ruined by his obnoxious brother-in-law.

Chet Ripley (John Candy) decides to take his family up to a rustic Wisconsin getaway and have a nice, peaceful vacation. Then Chet’s yuppie brother-in-law Roman (Dan Aykroyd) shows up with his strange family and decides to take over Chet’s vacation. Roman soon tells Chet that he has no money and has been faking the lifestyle and is looking for cash. Meanwhile, Chet’s son has a summer romance, and a giant bear is on the loose, looking for revenge, and Roman’s twin daughters go missing in an abandoned mine.

The Great Outdoors was part two of my John Candy-a-thon (part one was Uncle Buck) and while The Great Outdoors was also written by John Hughes, he chose not to direct it. While not as endearing or charming as Uncle Buck, The Great Outdoors still has some memorable moments. This time around, Candy plays a subdued family man, almost a Clark Griswold (from Vacation) type. Aykroyd plays a pushy, antagonistic guy that you almost feel sorry for but mostly not. I like Dan Aykroyd, but this role always kind of gets on my nerves.

If there’s one thing that holds back The Great Outdoors is the superfluous teen romance. Not only does it break up the flow, but it changes the tone of the movie into typical 80s teenager fare. It’s almost like they didn’t feel like they had enough movie there without it and threw it in just to make the film longer than 70 or 80 minutes. It doesn’t kill the movie, but I found myself zoning out a bit during those scenes.

The most memorable thing about The Great Outdoors for me was the giant bear. When Chet is telling the story about shooting the bear but only taking the fur off its scalp, your imagination paints a picture (even more so as a kid). When the bear actually shows up bald, it gets me every time. There are a few other parts that stick out, most of them involving Candy, but on a whole it’s a fairly anemic film.

Since The Great Outdoors comes as part of the John Candy boxset (also alongside Going Berserk, which I don’t hugely care for). While it has some laughs, it is not one of John Candy’s best films. The Great Outdoors is enjoyable to watch but there are better John Candy / John Hughes films to watch.

I give it 3 water skiing scenes out of 5.

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Uncle Buck (8/17/12)

Uncle BuckMovie One Hundred Ninety One

A family crisis causes a need for a babysitter for a rebellious teenage daughter and her two younger siblings, so they call in Uncle Buck.

In the Chicago suburbs, Cindy (Elaine Bromka) and Bob Russell (Garrett M. Brown) live with their teenage daughter Tia (Jean Louisa Kelly), son Miles (Macaulay Culkin), and daughter Maizy (Gaby Hoffman). When Cindy’s father has a heart attack, the parents reluctantly decide to travel to see him and leave the kids in the care of Bob’s good-hearted, but slovenly brother, Buck (John Candy). When Uncle Buck arrives, the young kids immediately take to him due to his fun nature, but Tia constantly puts up a battle that only a teenage girl could.

Uncle Buck was part one of my two part John Candy marathon alongside The Great Outdoors. As one of the numerous John Hughes films starring John Candy, Uncle Buck is one of my favorites, after Planes, Trains & Automobiles. When John Candy is playing a funny, good-natured guy that just can’t catch a break, I immediately empathize. Buck Russell is a good guy that can’t seem to get his own life in order but you can’t help but love. Toss in some cute kids to lighten the mood and it’s a recipe for success.

I grew up watching John Hughes movies and it’s funny that so many of them are similar but still seem totally original and always enjoyable. Uncle Buck is one of those movies that defines Hughes’ non high school films and will likely stand the test of time. It’s easy to compare Candy’s roles here and Planes, Trains & Automobiles, they are quite similar but have different motivations and instead of Steve Martin to riff off of, Candy has young Culkin and Hoffman and himself. The role of Buck really lets Candy shine on his own and that is what helps make Uncle Buck special.

While it may not be the laugh out loud comedy that you keep coming back to, Uncle Buck is one of those movies that just makes you feel good. The movie has a big heart and a solid sense of humor and it plays to those strengths. As part of the legacy of both John Hughes and John Candy, Uncle Buck is surely a winner.

I give it 4 “I’m a kid, that’s my job”s out of 5.

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Indie Game: The Movie (8/16/12)

Indie Game: The MovieMovie One Hundred Ninety

Three independent video game developers share their stories before, after, and during development of the titles in Indie Game: The Movie.

Indie Game: The Movie follows Jonathan Blow, creator of hugely successful Braid, Edmund McMillen and Tommy Refenes, creators of Super Meat Boy, and Phil Fish, creator of Fez. Blow reflects on Braid, the only game to have already been released at the time of the documentary and as far as indie game successes go, it is the current water mark. McMillen and Refenes (aka Team Meat) and Phil Fish are both currently in development of their respectful projects. The documentary covers the long, sleepless nights, the worrying, the financial struggle, the passion of games, and the eventual successes these independent developers face in an industry where the growing trend is “bigger is better”.

Video games have been a major component of my life literally for as long as I can remember. I got a Nintendo Entertainment System for Christmas in 1987 when I was five, and haven’t looked back. Even before my NES I was playing my sister’s Atari and our Commodore 64. I bring this up because it would be easy to assume that Indie Game: The Movie is only for hardcore gaming nerds, like myself. This is not the case, but it certainly helps.

All three games that are covered in Indie Game: The Movie are available for purchase, you may have even already own them. The stories do not require playing the games, but you will glean an extra appreciation for them. Super Meat Boy, a game that flew off the rails in terms of financial success was literally created by two guys in around two years. If that isn’t an underdog story, video games or not, I don’t know what is. The gaming industry has evolved (some may say “devolved”) into a state where every major game has to be the equivalent of a Michael Bay action-epic. Lots of money, lots of people involved, lots of eye-candy. These independent developers hearken back to a time when video games had a simple objective and were merely fun.

From a technical aspect, Indie Game: The Movie is incredibly well-produced. The flow between the stories is great, and also has some interviews with people in the industry. Production of the documentary is much like the games being covered, it’s small but polished and most of all, it’s fun to watch. Obviously, it will be most interesting to fans of the video games being covered, or video games in general, but Indie Game: The Movie is an interesting tale from this generation’s art form.

I give it 5 Phil Fish in the bars out of 5.

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Goon (8/12/12)

GoonMovie One Hundred Eighty Nine

In Goon, a nightclub bouncer becomes a hockey star by fighting his way into the sport.

Doug Glatt (Seann William Scott) is the nicest bouncer around, apologizing to a man who he was being “bounced” from the bar as Doug was hitting him in the face. His hockey-loving friend, Pat (Jay Baruchel), takes him to a hockey game and when one of the players makes his way into the stands to fight Pat, Doug steps in to fight and becomes the star attraction. Doug is offered to play for a local team acting as a bouncer for the players on the ice and has to learn to skate. Doug is then promoted to a better team to guard their star player and becomes the target for veteran hockey thug, and Doug’s personal hero, Ross “The Boss” Rhea (Liev Schreiber).

Goon is the perfect example of “don’t call it a sports movie”. Yes, the film centers around hockey, but all you really need to know about hockey is that they skate on the ice, they shoot a puck into the net to score, and occasionally they fight. Goon is really about a somewhat dimwitted guy trying to find himself and he stumbles upon something he’s good at and tries to make his parents proud. I will concede that the film follows a familiar pattern that many sports movies have laid out, but at least Goon is different.

Seann William Scott is an actor that may turn some people off of Goon before even watching it, but Scott is very subdued and actually does a good job as Doug. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for Jay Baruchel, who is a constant shrieking of douchebaggery every second he is on screen. I kind of just cringed and hope he would pass. Still, Scott’s humor was subdued and effective here, I laughed more than a few times but I wouldn’t quite call Goon a comedy, but it is comedic.

While Goon may not be a classic film, it sets out to tell a story and it does so effectively and doesn’t overstay its welcome. I found a lot to like, and was always a bit surprised whenever I would read positive press, but now I can fully see why and Goon deserves it. If you have been put off by Goon being a sports movie, it’s not, and if you were put off by Seann William Scott, don’t be.

I give it 4 penalty boxes out of 5.

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