The Dark Knight (7/19/12)

The Dark KnightMovie One Hundred Seventy One

The Dark Knight continues Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy as Batman faces his nemesis, the Joker.

The Dark Knight begins with an elaborate bank heist orchestrated by the Joker (Heath Ledger). Gotham has a new DA in Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) who vows to clean up organized crime along with his assistant DA, Rachel Dawes (this time played by Maggie Gyllenhaal). Gordon (Gary Oldman) and Batman (Christian Bale) decide to trust Dent. The Joker disrupts an organized crime meeting between several factions and essentially controls the city’s underworld. After Dawes and Dent are placed at separate locations with lots of explosives and a timer, Batman saves Dent but he is disfigured. Joker turns Dent against himself he vows revenge for losing Rachel. Batman must now figure out a way to stop Joker and also deal with the newly formed Two-Face while still remaining the hero that Gotham deserves.

It turns out that writing an abbreviated plot outline for The Dark Knight is much harder than I anticipated. A lot of things happen in the film that the 150+ minute run time can attest to. The second part of  Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy, many consider The Dark Knight to be the pinnacle of the series. I attribute this largely to his brother, Jonathan, who helped write the script for the film. Everything in this film is there for a reason and a pretty damn smart reason, too. Further diving into the “realistic” world of Batman, The Dark Knight created one of the greatest villains ever on screen in the Joker. The fact that Joker is only a portion of the plot here is remarkable.

When The Dark Knight was released, it contained several scenes that were shot for IMAX screens and this was the first IMAX film I saw that truly blew me away. While it’s always a thrill to see a bigger, louder version of a film in theaters, when something is built specifically for IMAX it shows. Even a lesser film would have been breathtaking if shot like this, but from the very opening shot for the entire film it grabs you and doesn’t let up. As I said about Batman Begins, The Dark Knight is not only an amazing superhero movie, it is simply a great movie.

If Batman Begins put Christopher Nolan on the map for many people, then The Dark Knight solidified his position as a great filmmaker. The Dark Knight is difficult to fault and is something that I could easily recommend to everyone.

I give it 5 “you complete me”s out of 5.

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The Dark Knight Rises (7/20/12) [Spoiler-free]

Movie One Hundred Seventy Two

The Dark Knight Rises concludes Christopher Nolan’s spectacular Batman trilogy with Bruce Wayne donning the suit of Gotham’s hero for perhaps the final time.

Picking up eight years after the end of The Dark Knight, The Dark Knight Rises has Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) living in seclusion, except for Alfred (Michael Caine) of course, after he uses Batman as a martyr and sets Harvey Dent up as Gotham’s real hero. During a party at Wayne Manor, Bruce finds a young woman stealing his mother’s necklace and taking his fingerprints. Bruce soon finds out this woman is Selina Kyle, aka Catwoman (Anne Hathaway) and she is selling Wayne’s fingerprints for a plot by Bane (Tom Hardy) to bring down Bruce Wayne and also Gotham city itself. With the assistance of old friend Lucius Fox (Morgan Freeman), Commissioner Gordon (Gary Oldman), “hotheaded” rookie cop John Blake (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), and board member Miranda (Marion Cotillard), Bruce Wayne must come out of the shadows to become Batman and save Gotham before Bane destroys everything.

There are no doubt going to be people that walk away from The Dark Knight Rises disappointed, it’s inevitable. And yes, there are some disappointing things about the film, but nitpicking aside, it shows some of the strongest filmmaking of the trilogy and I would say it actually exceeded my expectations by a fair margin. Christopher and Jonathan Nolan have pulled out all the stops for The Dark Knight Rises and I will say that the action grabs you by the throat early on and doesn’t even let up, though the film throws a lot at you to begin with so that helps keep you on your toes.

While I did not view this film on an IMAX screen (I will in a few weeks, though) there is obvious care taken to filming and I could safely guess which portions of the film were shot for IMAX. The sets are somehow even grander than The Dark Knight and Gotham feels larger too. Both Batman Begins and The Dark Knight were filmed here in Chicago and The Dark Knight Rises was filmed elsewhere (Philadelphia, I believe Pittsburgh) so that may play a part in this. Most surprising for me was the high quality acting, Michael Caine especially. It would be forgivable for a comic book film to have the actors mostly phone it in, but the actors all truly deliver here. The only exception would possibly be Tom Hardy as Bane…

Which leads me to my few nitpicking gripes about the The Dark Knight Rises. Bane is my biggest peeve since he sounds like a cross between Hardy’s earlier role in Bronson and Sean Connery doing a Peter Sellers impersonation. Obviously test audiences had a hell of a time understanding Bane when he talked, so they made his voice this way on purpose and it sits high in the mix too. At least he is clearly audible. My other main gripe is that the CGI is a bit uneven. Nolan is fantastic at using real sets for his stunts so maybe the CGI portions just stood out because of this, but I thought some of the bits looked a bit flat.

I was not expecting to be surprised by The Dark Knight Rises and yet I was. Several times, in fact. While Christopher Nolan may not be returning to Batman films anytime, I hope he and and his brother are at the very least creative consultants on the next set of Batman films. In case you are wondering if I prefer this film over The Dark Knight, it’s a close call. In fact, I would rate all three of Nolan’s Batman films 5/5 so technically I can be noncommittal and say they all tie! I will be seeing The Dark Knight Rises again very soon and I honestly cannot wait. This is a real contender for best film of 2012.

I give it 5 Pee-Wee Herman narrates the trailers out of 5.

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