Uncle Buck (8/17/12)

Uncle BuckMovie One Hundred Ninety One

A family crisis causes a need for a babysitter for a rebellious teenage daughter and her two younger siblings, so they call in Uncle Buck.

In the Chicago suburbs, Cindy (Elaine Bromka) and Bob Russell (Garrett M. Brown) live with their teenage daughter Tia (Jean Louisa Kelly), son Miles (Macaulay Culkin), and daughter Maizy (Gaby Hoffman). When Cindy’s father has a heart attack, the parents reluctantly decide to travel to see him and leave the kids in the care of Bob’s good-hearted, but slovenly brother, Buck (John Candy). When Uncle Buck arrives, the young kids immediately take to him due to his fun nature, but Tia constantly puts up a battle that only a teenage girl could.

Uncle Buck was part one of my two part John Candy marathon alongside The Great Outdoors. As one of the numerous John Hughes films starring John Candy, Uncle Buck is one of my favorites, after Planes, Trains & Automobiles. When John Candy is playing a funny, good-natured guy that just can’t catch a break, I immediately empathize. Buck Russell is a good guy that can’t seem to get his own life in order but you can’t help but love. Toss in some cute kids to lighten the mood and it’s a recipe for success.

I grew up watching John Hughes movies and it’s funny that so many of them are similar but still seem totally original and always enjoyable. Uncle Buck is one of those movies that defines Hughes’ non high school films and will likely stand the test of time. It’s easy to compare Candy’s roles here and Planes, Trains & Automobiles, they are quite similar but have different motivations and instead of Steve Martin to riff off of, Candy has young Culkin and Hoffman and himself. The role of Buck really lets Candy shine on his own and that is what helps make Uncle Buck special.

While it may not be the laugh out loud comedy that you keep coming back to, Uncle Buck is one of those movies that just makes you feel good. The movie has a big heart and a solid sense of humor and it plays to those strengths. As part of the legacy of both John Hughes and John Candy, Uncle Buck is surely a winner.

I give it 4 “I’m a kid, that’s my job”s out of 5.

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